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Jan5

Part One: The Top 10 Double Glazing Selling Methods You Should Avoid

Author: Conservatories & Double Glazing Expert  |  Leave a Comment >>

The beginning of the New Year will be when thousands of householders look to upgrade their windows with double glazing and we would not want any of them to get caught out by dishonest sales methods.

We can all emphasise with those property owners who have been pushed into a sale that does not turn out to be as good as advertised by a salesman.

So that you do not find yourself in a similar scenario this January, or in the future, read the first part of our blog post on the Top 10 sales methods to avoid.

1. Price conditioning versus price guides

‘Price conditioning’ is a common approach taken when a salesman seeks to establish a price expectation in the mind of a customer ahead of any price or quote being provided.

They attempt to gain awareness of any price expectation of a customer by asking questions such as ‘what is your budget?’ and ‘how much might you be prepared to pay?’ Once they have this information they then try to establish a figure in their own mind that they feel will seal the deal.

We avoid such tactics and pride ourselves on providing transparency throughout. We will take on-board exactly what you need and then give you a price based on those specific requirements. When a discount is available, we will explain exactly why it is.

2. Bogus offers & discounts, for one day only versus genuine discounts

Manufacturing a ‘bogus offer’ or ‘huge discount’ that’s exclusive for a single day is a further way that salesmen fool buyers into making a purchase.
It is deceiving to promise a fabricated offer there and then or further down the line to try and convince someone that they are getting the bargain of a lifetime.

You should always exercise your right to find out what rival firms can do for you and assess their ability to meet your demands.

You will know that a firm is likely to be trustworthy when they send you a detailed full written quote that acknowledges any discount applied. You should never be forced to make a decision on the spot.

3. Big price drops and their fabricated reasons for being

It is not unknown for a salesman to falsely make up a price to see how you react to it and then go completely quiet in the hope that you will communicate your price expectations.

Your response will determine what they do next. If you let out a big gasp then they know to lower the price and leave you feeling immensely relieved.
You can usually tell when a firm is giving you’re their genuinely best quote as they will resolutely stick to it.

4. Advertising large discounts (say 55%) on products that the company in reality doesn’t sell…

To encourage you to invite a salesman into your house, there are firms out there that will advertise a significant discount. The salesman will then inform you that the relevant discount is attributed to an inferior product that they wouldn’t recommend (they say this as the product doesn’t actually exist), due to it failing when it comes to thermal efficiency, security and appearance.

Their next step will be to introduce you to an alternative and superior window, before issuing you with an expensive quote and commencing with the ‘process’.

If that salesman was honest they would not speak of two different windows and just inform you of the best window option they have available.

5. Advertising ‘with prices from £cheap…’

A trademark move of the salesman in this example will be them quoting an expensive price from the off and then slashing it. You may be given an advertised price for a window or door, only to find out that should you want any extras, such as any modifying of the design or size that they will add to the price.

The price given should be inclusive of everything.

Read the full guide here – Clearview’s Ultimate Guide to Double Glazing Sales Techniques.

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Conservatory Outlet - A Quality Network

Conservatory Outlet - A Quality Network

Conservatory Outlet is an established UK wide network of home improvement companies, specialising in the installation of superior quality double glazing windows, replacement doors, conservatories and bespoke orangeries.

As ambassadors of the Conservatory Outlet brand - Clearview Home Improvements in Cheshire & Lancashire has demonstrated an unrivalled commitment to quality, innovation and customer satisfaction. In return Conservatory Outlet provides Clearview with the most revolutionary and sought after home improvement products currently available, which are produced to the highest industry standards.

Throughout the UK, our logo is a trusted hallmark which guarantees your total satisfaction and peace of mind when you choose Conservatory Outlet for your home improvement.

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